Fitness

Voltarol Gel Review: Does it work?

Over the years, I have used just about everything to help me with my knees, and sore joints from my years of playing rugby and lifting weights. I’ve used cooling and warming balms, gels and all kinds of things to help overcome the doms and bruising from impacts.

I would think that I am a good guinea pig for trying out the Voltarol Joint Pain Relief Gel and comparing it to the likes of deep heat.

So, here is our Voltarol Joints Pain gel review. A one-stop shop for everything you need to know.

 

What is Voltarol Gel?

The basics behind Voltarol is that it is a ‘pain relief’ brand and produces a range of creams and gels designed to reduce inflammation and make joint pain manageable. The gels contain a chemical called a powerful non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug called Diclofenac, which is usually prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, sprains, injuries, back pain and even tooth pain.

The drug is often prescribed as an oral tablet which gives general inflammation support, however, Voltarol Gel applies the drug topically and directly to the source of pain. The gel uses ‘Emulgel technology which allows the diclofenac to deeply penetrate the skin and tissues allowing a much more targeted application of the inflammation relief. The gel also has a cooling effect which may come from something like menthol.

It seems as though the gels are marketed toward the ‘older generations who are more likely to suffer from aches, pains and health conditions caused by inflammation. But, there is plenty of uses for sportspeople – especially rugby players.

 

Our Voltarol Review

Of all the things that I have tried, Voltarol is one of the more effective out there. I still have some left in my first aid box for when I take a fall or bad tackle on the pitch. I can say that when I have sprained a joint or taken a knock the gel comes in very handy.

You can purchase a tube of 2.23% gel for up to £19 with Boots, or on Amazon for £10 for a smaller tube. For what the gel offers, this is quite reasonable. You only need to use a tiny amount of the product so it can last a long time.

There are some side effects of using diclofenac for 1% of people – the symptoms include.

  • feeling sick (nausea)
  • being sick (vomiting) or diarrhoea.
  • feeling dizzy or vertigo.
  • headaches.
  • stomach ache, wind or loss of appetite.
  • mild rash.

It would be nice to try a natural alternative.

 

Can you use Voltarol on your neck?

The short answer is, yes. You can use Voltarol on your neck and it is actually a great way to reduce neck pain. The active ingredient, diclofenac, is often used for reducing back pain, so using it for neck pain is completely safe.

A few years ago when I was playing Rugby, I sustained a neck injury during a tackle. Something similar to whiplash. I used Voltarol religiously for 2 weeks and I can say that it certainly helps.

 

Deep Heat Vs Voltarol

I tend to use the two for different reasons. The main difference between Voltarol and Deep Heat is the active ingredient, Diclofenac.

Deep Heat offers ‘heat therapy’ which causes a reaction and draws blood into the area where the balm is applied. It contains Methyl Salicylate, Menthol, Eucalyptus Oil and Turpentine Oil which are what cause cooling and warming effects – in doing so, it offers some relief from pain and some inflammation reductions. This is much better for general use and for when you’re about to start your training, or after to help with your recovery.

Voltarol also has a cooling effect too but most of its effectiveness comes from the contents of Diclofenac. Voltarol is much more effective for an injury or deep tissue pain caused by damage. If you’ve got sore knees as I do, I generally use Deep Heat on a normal day to loosen them up. But if it is cold, or they are feeling particularly sore, then I will grab the Voltarol.

 

One Comment

  • Elspeth

    Voltorol doesn’t give me any relief Ice pack works better even though not for long. I have start of arthritis in hip and knee plus torn knee cartelage. Nothing kills the pain.

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