Food & Nutrition

8 high fibre breakfast cereals you can buy in the UK

Published by Finn Hayden

Fibre is an essential yet overlooked nutrient that many of us simply don't get enough of. The recommended daily intake is 30g, but most of us struggle to even get 20g per day. The morning is typically the best time to try and get some fibre into your diet, which is why there are so many breakfast cereals which are advertised as being high in fibre. But which of these breakfast cereals actually has the highest amount of fibre? We wanted to find out, so we did some research. Let's get into it:

All-Bran - 27g of fibre per 100g

All-Bran is a household name at this point and is well known for being absolutely packed with fibre. 27g of fibre per 100g is a huge amount and makes All-Bran one of the highest fibre breakfast cereals you can buy in the UK by far. All-Bran is made from Wheat bran and not much else. It is recommended to mix All-Bran with fruit, which not only makes the cereal a bit more palatable but also increases the amount of fibre per bowl. 

All-Bran

It's worth mentioning that All-Bran does contain sugar, which is something people are not often aware of. Learn more and buy this cereal here - amazon.co.uk

Waitrose High Fibre Bran Sticks - 24.9g fibre per 100g

The fibre content of this supermarket's own-brand cereal really surprised us - almost 25g per 100g is right up there with All-Bran, which is generally considered to be the best breakfast cereal for getting your fibre fix. The High Fibre Bran Sticks from Waitrose aren't very fancy and to be honest, we didn't enjoy eating them much. But they taste about as good as All-Bran, plus they contain less sugar (12.3g per 100g versus 18g per 100g in All-Bran). On top of all of that, they're also cheaper at less than £2 per box. We think that if you're looking for a fibre cereal to stock up on, give the High Fibre Bran Sticks from Waitrose a shot. Learn more and buy the product here - waitrose.com

Waitrose High Fibre Bran Sticks

Crunchy Bran - 22g fibre per 100g

What we find really impressive about Crunchy Bran, aside from the high amount of fibre in every 100g, is that it actually tastes pretty good. It might just be our personal taste, but we could quite happily eat this as a normal breakfast cereal, and we certainly find it more enjoyable to eat compared to the likes of All-Bran. This might be because although Crunchy Bran is made from 52% wheat bran, it is also made using Wholegrain Wheat (30%) and Oat Bran (12%). This mix of fibre sources seems to give the cereal a lot more crunch, and also a bit more flavour. Buy this product and learn more here - amazon.co.uk

Crunchy Bran

Bran Flakes - 17g fibre per 100g

For many people, eating Bran Flakes every morning is a much more manageable task than eating All-Bran. Although they don't have quite as much fibre per 100g (almost half as much, actually), Bran Flakes do taste better than All-Bran and are still one of the best cereals to eat if you're trying to get more fibre in your diet. Unlike All-Bran, Bran Flakes are made mostly from wholewheat, and only contain 18% wheat bran (whereas All-Bran is 86% wheat bran). This gives Bran Flakes a much lighter taste compared to the heaviness of All-Bran. Also, as we mentioned in a previous guide, Bran Flakes are pretty healthy overall. Buy the product and learn more here - sainsburys.co.uk

Bran Flakes

Post Grape Nuts - 12g fibre per 100g

Grape Nuts is a cereal brand which was been popular in the States for more than 100 years but has recently made its way over to the UK with good success. Aside from having quite a strange name, Grape Nuts is also a good source of fibre with 12g per 100g of cereal. Similar to the Crunchy Bran we included in our list earlier, if you're a fan of cereal with a real crunch then Grape Nuts is definitely worth trying. We certainly find it to be a lot tastier than the likes of All-Bran. Learn more and buy the product online here - amazon.co.uk

Grape Nuts

Sharpham Park Spelt Bran Flakes - 9.3g fibre per 100g

This very patriotic-looking cereal won't be found in every supermarket, but you can buy it online and you can also usually find it in Waitrose. Sharpham Park isn't necessarily a household name, but their Spelt Bran Flakes are very popular and a great source of fibre at 9.3g per 100g. It's also interesting to note that this is the only cereal using predominantly spelt as the source of fibre, which according to Sharpham Park is a superior source of fibre to something like wheat bran and is also a good source of protein. Learn more and buy it here - ocado.com

Sharpham Park Spelt Bran Flakes

Dorset Cereals Luscious Berry & Cherry Muesli - 9.2g fibre per 100g

We knew that Dorset Cereals was a popular breakfast muesli brand, but we didn't expect them to have a product which was so high in fibre - their Luscious Berry & Cherry Muesli was the highest in fibre that we could find in their range, at 9.2g per 100g. And dare we say it, this is probably the best-tasting cereal we've included in this list. However, it also happens to be the most expensive, at £4 per box in the supermarkets we checked. Learn more and buy this cereal here - amazon.co.uk

Dorset Cereals

Fruit 'n Fibre - 9g fibre per 100g

Although 9g of fibre per 100g is still a good amount, we do have to admit that we expected to find more in Fruit 'n Fibre (after all, it's the only breakfast cereal in this list with 'fibre' in the name). But the one thing that we really like about Fruit 'n Fibre is that it tastes really good. Unlike the other Kellog's cereals we've included in this list, Fruit 'n Fibre contains no wheat brand and is mostly made from wholewheat (69%). Learn more about this product and buy it here - tesco.com

Fruit 'n fibre

Hopefully, the above list has demonstrated that we have lots of great high-fibre breakfast cereals available to buy here in the UK. If you're looking for some similar articles to read, we have a guide about how healthy Shreddies are and how healthy Special K is.

Finn is the editor of You Well and has been writing about travel, health, and more for over 10 years.

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